With A Week To Go, This Is Already The 8th Snowiest February In NYC History

[ad_1]

As you’ve got seemingly seen, we’re within the midst of a really snowy February this 12 months, with 25.6 inches of accumulation measured to date. This makes it NYC’s eighth snowiest February ever, in accordance with the Nationwide Climate Service’s information, which start in 1868. And there could also be a bit of extra on the way in which!

Local weather change has introduced each hotter winter temperatures and extra snow occasions to town, and a few consultants consider that the more and more heat world temperatures are disturbing the polar vortex. The polar vortex, because the Nationwide Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration explains, “is a low stress space—a large expanse of swirling chilly air—that’s parked in polar areas. Throughout winter, the polar vortex on the North Pole expands, sending chilly air southward.”

With the Arctic changing into hotter, Judah Cohen, director of seasonal forecasting at Atmospheric and Environmental Analysis, a climate threat evaluation firm, colder winters in our area could also be extra widespread. “You may consider it like a spinning high,” Cohen defined in an interview with Gothamist earlier this month. “You bang on the highest, it begins to wobble, it begins to meander. And the place the polar vortex goes, so goes the chilly air.”

This speculation has been met with some skepticism from scientists who say we want extra information to attract extra agency conclusions.

In NYC, February 2010 nonetheless holds the very best snowfall document—36.9 inches—adopted by 2014 (29 inches), 1934 (27.9 inches), 2006 (26.9 inches), 1994 (26.4 inches), 1926 (26.3 inches), 2003 (26.1 inches), after which 2021 (25.6 inches). But when NYC will get an inch of snow this week, we may leapfrog to the fifth snowiest February in historical past.

General, NYC has seen 38.2 inches of snow for the 2020-2021 winter to date, and there is nonetheless March and April to go!

Check out our up to date charts and graphs of snowfall beneath, and if in case you have different concepts or information units for us to visualise, you’ll be able to e-mail information@gothamist.com together with your solutions and questions!

With reporting from Lydia McMullen-Laird



[ad_2]