Ranked-Choice Voting Is Here, So Be Prepared

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Elections in New York Metropolis are going to be radically completely different in 2021, as town has formally entered the period of ranked-choice voting, after New Yorkers voted “sure” on a 2019 poll query. Now, one group in Queens would be the first to expertise it, with the particular election for the twenty fourth Council District that begins with early voting on Saturday, January twenty third.

Most New Yorkers who had been registered with a political celebration will get an opportunity to strive ranked-choice voting for the primary time on June twelfth when early voting for the first begins. Nevertheless, there are literally three extra particular elections—for Council Districts 31 (particular election day February twenty third, with early voting starting earlier than that) and 11 and 15 (March twenty third, with early voting earlier than that)—earlier than June, the place Bronx and Queens voters will get additionally one other likelihood to check out the brand new system.

HOW DOES RANKED-CHOICE VOTING WORK?

As a substitute of choosing only one candidate through the major, ranked-choice voting permits voters to pick out as much as 5 candidates so as of desire.




Your Ballot Will Look Something Like This:  (Blank ballot with candidates A-H plus a write-in choice. Candidates can be ranked from first choice to fifth choice)  Pick Your First Choice:  (Candidate B selected as the first choice with one oval filled in)  Pick Your Second Choice:  (Candidate A selected as the second choice if Candidate B does not win. Two ovals on the ballot, the first choice for Candidate A and the second choice for Candidate B)  You Can Rank Up To 5 Candidates:  (Candidates F, H and C filled as 3rd, 4th and 5th choices on the ballot)

Word: Don’t mark a couple of candidate per row (like, do not say that Candidate B is your 1st, 2nd, third, 4th, and fifth selection) and don’t mark a couple of candidate per column (don’t say each Candidate A and Candidate B are your 1st selection). The poll scanner will inform you if you’re marking a couple of candidate per column.




Graphics showing Do NOT Rank A Candidate More Than Once:  Do NOT Mark More Than 1 Oval Per Column:

After your poll is solid, the Board of Elections will tally votes. If a candidate will get greater than 50% of the first-choice vote, that candidate wins the election. But when no candidate will get greater than 50%, that is the place ranked-choice voting kicks in.

The candidate with the least variety of first-choice votes is eradicated, and everybody who voted for that last-place candidate may have their second-choice voices tallied and redistributed among the many different candidates.

If a candidate will get greater than 50% of this spherical 2 vote, then there is a winner.

If no candidate will get greater than 50%, and the method begins once more, with the candidate who has the lease variety of first-choice votes getting eliminating and their voters’ second-choice picks getting redistributed.

This occurs till there’s one candidate with greater than 50% of the first- and second-choice vote. The Board of Elections calls this a “strategy of elimination” till there’s a winner.




Scenario 1: A candidate gets more than 50% of first-choice votes, winning the election  (Candidate B:  51% - Winner with over 50% of #1 votes)  Scenario 2: If no one gets over 50%, then a run-off count begins  (Candidate E: 5% - Got the least amount of #1 votes)  Candidate E is out of the race, but everyone who voted Candidate E #1, now gets their #2 choices redistributed to the remaining candidates.  (#1 Choices of Candidate E, #2 Choices circled to redistribute. Candidate D: 8% - Got the least amount of votes)  The process repeats, this time with Candidate D.  Candidate D is out of the race, along with Candidate E, but everyone who voted Candidate D #1, now gets their next ranked choice redistributed to the remaining candidates.  (#1 Choices of Candidate D, Next Ranked Choices circled to redistribute. Candidate B: 51% - Winner with over 50% of votes)

Listed here are FAQs about ranked-choice voting from the Board of Elections and Marketing campaign Finance Board. The BOE has additionally created a video to clarify RCV:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5VdJBo16fDM



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